ALIEN INFLUX JANUARY 28th 2006

‘Alien’ attacks Gardner Lights, camera … horror
Local filmmakers create sequel
By Craig S. Semon Staff reporter

GARDNER— In the Chair City, no one can hear you scream, especially if indie-filmmaker Andy Sawyer has any say about it.

As CEO of New Blood Production and Booo! Master Pictures, Mr. Sawyer has been making low-budget films for nearly 15 years, mostly horror
comedies (or “horromedies”), including “The Vampyre Pumpkins of St. Ives,” “The Templeton Witch Project,” “The Axe Wife” and “Honey, I
Burned Up the Baby!”

For his latest venture, Mr. Sawyer joined forces with two fellow filmmakers, Worcester’s film editor Andrew Shanley, and Manchester, N.H.,prop
master Thomas Pimentel. The result is “Alien Influx,” a homage (as well as a continuation) to the “Aliens” franchise, which made Sigourney
Weaver a star.

Mr. Sawyer, who wrote the script as well as directed the film and has a small role as a starship pilot, allowed his 2-1/2-car garage at his Gardner
home to be transformed into a complete space station, made up primarily of a dark and dreary labyrinth of transport bays, airshafts, medical
labs, secret vaults, shadowy corners, dead ends and plenty of creepy crawl space. Construction on the set took a weekend and filming took
place during two months of weekends.

In addition, Mr. Sawyer, a children’s art and drama teacher, made the “Alien” costumes at a fraction of the cost of a one-night rental, as well as
the “Alien” eggs and space station interior from scratch. With it’s bed foam membrane and menacing head constructed out of two-liter soda
bottles, the finished “Alien” costume cost roughly $80, $50 of which went to buying a leotard.

“The hardest part was making these aliens because I didn’t have anywhere to store them, so we keep them on the living room couch,” Mr.
Sawyer said. “My wife and I would be living with these things and we gave them names, Rodimere and Joseph. They will be sitting on the sofa with
us as we watched TV.”

Although Mr. Sawyer, Mr. Shanley and Mr. Pimentel have collaborated before, “Alien Influx” is the first time they shared all the responsibilities.
Currently the three are working on “Incantations” (for tentative summer release) and are already playing with ideas for an “Alien Influx” sequel.

“Andy (Sawyer) is a man of few words, for what he doesn’t say to people he shows us with the things that he makes,” Mr. Shanley said. “He may
be a quiet individual, but you know something, when you look at what he puts on the screen, it’s as loud as a bullhorn, which he uses quite often.”

Mr. Shanley, who served as the film’s executive producer, public relations liaison and one of the film’s stars, (playing the ill-fated Colonial Marine
Cpl. Jonathan Roal), spoke about “Alien Influx” during its recent premiere at the Odd Fellows Home in West Boylston.

“One of the things that we wanted to do with this is actually produce a fan film that fans of the ‘Aliens’ series could really appreciate,” Mr. Shanley
said.

“We’re film fans. We do this not for the money. We don’t do this for the fame. We do this for the sheer love of being able to produce something
that people are really going to enjoy. This is a project that is a labor of love for us.”

The reality that they are not going to make money off the project (which cost an estimated $3,000-$4,000) doesn’t bother them a bit, Mr. Shanley
said. “There are millions of ‘Star Wars’ fan films and ‘Star Trek’ fan films but there are not many ‘Aliens’ fan films. Since Andy, Tom and I always
quote ‘Aliens,’ we said what the heck, let’s do one,” Mr. Shanley explained.

The action in “Alien Influx” unfolds in the year 2188 on a remote testing facility (Mr. Sawyer’s garage) in the vast space of the Arturian System
(Gardner). When scientific experiments go awry and all contact is broken a rescue crew is called in to access the human causalities and damage.

“This pretty much happens after Alien 4 (‘Alien: Resurrection’),” Mr. Shanley explained. “It’s completely new. It doesn’t have anything to do with
Sigourney Weaver’s character or anything like that. The ‘xenomorphs’ (‘Aliens’) aren’t a big secret anymore. The military knows about them and
so do all the characters in this movie.”

In the role that is equivalent to Weaver’s Warrant Officer Ellen Ripley, Chrissy Rondano plays the heroine, Navy Lt./Internal Affairs Officer
Samantha Heart. Prior to “Alien Influx,” the kindergarten teacher from North Quincy played “a chainsaw-wielding clown girl” and double-barrel
zombie killer running amuck in a hospital.

“It’s a lot of fun. It’s a great stress reliever,” she said.

Mr. Pimentel, who plays Colonial Marine James Higgens in “Alien Influx,”

poked fun at himself, while explaining the concept of fan films during his introduction before the film’s premiere screening.

“Fan films are simply movie creations of all formats created by the fans intended to entertain and expand the world in which each genre of films
exist,” he said. “In short, it’s a movie geek’s excuse to dress up like Han Solo or a Colonial Marine and live out our childhood fantasies. Some
people even go as far as to duplicate a masterpiece like ‘Indiana Jones.’ Geeks like that are the worst.”

Also during his introduction, Mr. Pimentel explained the passion involved in making a fan film like “Alien Influx.”

“This is not Hollywood. We were three guys in a garage building sets, creating costumes, lighting, shooting, editing, building scale models,
recording sound effects, blowing up Ryan Sullivan as often as possible, mixing fake blood, acting and managing full-time jobs, a social life and a
family all at the same time and only on available Saturdays and Sundays,” he said. “Yes, we realize that this is not Hollywood. For if it were
Hollywood you would have needed 60 or more professionals from 27 departments working full time to achieve what three guys pulled off with
passion and heart.”

After the screening, Mr. Pimentel said “Alien” is his mother’s favorite movie and credited her for his taste in films.

“When I was growing up, she would watch “Alien” on TV and our bedroom was right next to the den,” Mr. Pimentel recalled. “I remember standing
in our bedroom door watching her watch the movie being scared. She was the one who had the film background. She brought me up on good
films, which is why I have so much material to draw from.”

Mr. Pimentel, an event videographer who owns a movie props and costume sales and rental business, edited the final product. Mr. Pimentel, who
has been making movies since he was 10 years old, said he is confident that he’s going to get his foot in a big studio door someday.

“We know that we’re not amateurs. We know that we are at an intermediate level,” Mr. Pimentel said. “The only thing that is stopping us at
achieving what we have potential for is money.”

Besides being a fan film, Mr. Pimentel envisions “Alien Influx” as “the ultimate demo reel” and “a giant calling card” for corporate suits out in
Hollywood, showing what they are capable of doing on a shoestring budget and, if they only had a blockbuster’s budget, a hint of what they could
be capable of.

Mr. Shanley said the best-case scenario would be if someone like Steven Spielberg gave them a call.

“Whether or not we become famous or not, whether this is a stepping stone to something bigger or more productive in the future or not, I’m
happy with everything we put together so far,” Mr. Shanley explained.

STREET PLAYERS


News columnist gets whacked in indie film being shot in Framingham

By Chris Bergeron/News Staff Writer
Thursday, January 27, 2005

Lights. Cameras. Kill Lenny Megliola.

An unshaven man in a knit cap shot the veteran sportswriter through the heart with a .45 caliber pistol Friday morning in a dingy hall in the
Bancroft Building in south Framingham.

Revenge for unflattering columns in the MetroWest Daily News? A hit man who does not like the avuncular sweaters he wears on New England
Cable News?

In fact, Megliola was whacked on the set of “Street Players,” an independent feature film being made by three guys with deep Framingham roots.

It’s the hardest part I’ve ever played,” said the faux blood-splattered writer and amateur actor. “I’ve died before but never this violently.”

Writer/director Drew Pearlman described his first feature-length film as a “gritty crime drama.”

Pearlman and producers John Fitzgerald and James Spirakis are pooling their resources to make the film that will feature area talent and
locations and, hopefully, bring bigger movie productions to town.

It will include scenes shot at two downtown pubs, Bruburgers and Connery’s Inn on Rte. 135, the Bancroft Building at 59 Fountain St. and “the
weeds” by Farm Pond. Another scene was filmed at the Central House Cafe in Westborough.

Spirakis, who runs Jim Spirakis Photo: Design on the second floor of the Bancroft Building, said he became involved in the film when Pearlman
came to the building scouting locations.

Although not a native, he has strong ties to Natick through his mother. Spirakis opened his photography business in the Bancroft Building seven
years ago.

All three have family in the area, but Spirakis, Pearlman and Fitzgerald had not known each other until they decided to make “Street Players,” he
said.

“I always wanted to be involved in movies. We’ve turned into the ‘Three Amigos,’” Spirakis said.

A 35-year-old Framingham native, Fitzgerald formerly produced “On The Hook,” a show about saltwater fishing on NESN.

He said expects shooting will continue through February and a “rough cut” of the film to be finished by the end of March.

Westborough businessman Victor J. Melfa Jr., who helped produce “Freedom Park,” another independent movie with scenes shot in
Framingham, will help distribute the film.

“Street Players” also includes ex-Bruins player Lyndon Byers, Catherine Papile, who stars in Latin American soap operas, and Megliola.

Megliola brings name recognition, acting experience, and from the looks of his Friday performance, a high red blood cell count.

A sports writer, columnist and arts critic for the MetroWest Daily News for more than 35 years, he has also performed in theatrical productions
staged by the Concord Players, Southborough Players, Hovey Players of Waltham and the Vokes Players of Wayland.

Megliola also discusses sports on WEEI radio, “Sports Late Night” on New England Cable News and “SportsPulse” on Channel 3.

Playing “Mobster Number One,” he appeared on set dressed in natty black gangster chic and tinted granny glasses.

“Don’t I bleed better than anybody?” he joked as makeup artist Rosa Colon attached a blood squib to protective body armor worn beneath his
shirt. “I bet a lot of athletes will pay to see a sports writer get killed.”

That is exactly what the 30-year-old Pearlman hopes.

He described his first full-length feature as a “tale of crime and revenge” involving a young man named “Jake Barnes” who goes on the run after
ripping off a ruthless mobster named “Fat Daddy.”

Barnes is played by James Elwood, a Boston-area actor who resembles Hollywood star Jason Patric. Actress Cindy Lentol, who has performed in
several movies and television shows, plays “Gina,” the loyal girlfriend who stands by her man.

Pearlman, who has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English, said giving his anti-hero the same name as a character in Ernest Hemingway’s
short stories reflects his interest in powerful tales of loss and redemption. He said for the last several months he’s been calling Elwood “Jake” to
keep him in character.

A 1992 graduate of Framingham High School, Pearlman started his own company, Road Rambler Films in 1997, to produce his movies, which
include eight 10- to 15-minute shorts that have been shown in art house festivals and over the Internet.

Fitzgerald said the movie is “making history” as one of the first independent films shot with a Canon XL2 DV camera, normally used in bigger
productions, which will give the finished product a unique visual style.

Pearlman thanked several local businesses for supporting the film project by donating food, services and locations. They include Firefly’s
restaurant, the Franklin Street Dunkin’ Donuts, La Cantina restaurant, Bruburgers, Connery’s Inn and MetroWest Livery Service of Framingham.

Fitzgerald credited the Boston Camera, the Camera Company of Norwood, High Output, Talamas Broadcast and Hadley Media of Salem, N.H.,
for leasing cameras, monitors, walkie-talkies and lighting equipment at good rates.

Shooting on a frigid morning, the production crew turned the first floor of the Bancroft Building into a hybrid of a Hollywood production and a low
level Mob hit.

Director of Photography Mike Pecci of Framingham peered into a video monitor, viewing earlier takes of Megliola’s cinematic murder. In a drafty
hall, sound technician Brian Courchine checked his recording equipment.

A Wayland resident, Courchine said his biggest technical challenge was keeping “extraneous noise” from businesses in the building and trains
running on the nearby tracks from blotting out dialogue.

His assistant, boom operator Camden Pollio, a Boston College English major, rehearsed his graphic lines for a small role as a mobster in the film.

Production manager Rudy Hypolite returned to the scene of the crime to say he wanted another take of Megliola getting shot.

Thomas Pimentel, who provides the film’s artificial weapons, passed out ear plugs to protect crewmembers’ears when the mock gun went off.
Colon taped a bag of artificial blood to Megliola’s chest.

Pimentel ordered quiet on the set.

Elwood, as the vengeance-crazed hero, walked down the dim hall. He sees Megliola standing against the wall and brings up a heavy black gun.

Boom.

Megliola, sportswriter and thespian, meets another deadline.

( For more information about “Street Players,” visit the Web site, www.roadramblerfilms.com )

STREET PLAYERS

News columnist gets whacked in indie film being shot in Framingham
By Chris Bergeron/News Staff Writer

Thursday, January 27, 2005

Lights. Cameras. Kill Lenny Megliola.


An unshaven man in a knit cap shot the veteran sportswriter through the heart with a .45 caliber pistol Friday morning in a dingy hall in the
Bancroft Building in south Framingham.
Revenge for unflattering columns in the MetroWest Daily News? A hit man who does not like the avuncular sweaters he wears on New England
Cable News?
In fact, Megliola was whacked on the set of “Street Players,” an independent feature film being made by three guys with deep Framingham roots...


... Director of Photography Mike Pecci of Framingham peered into a video monitor, viewing earlier takes of Megliola’s cinematic murder. In a
drafty hall, sound technician Brian Courchine checked his recording equipment.
A Wayland resident, Courchine said his biggest technical challenge was keeping “extraneous noise” from businesses in the building and trains
running on the nearby tracks from blotting out dialogue.
His assistant, boom operator Camden Pollio, a Boston College English major, rehearsed his graphic lines for a small role as a mobster in the film.
Production manager Rudy Hypolite returned to the scene of the crime to say he wanted another take of Megliola getting shot.
Thomas Pimentel, who provides the film’s artificial weapons, passed out ear plugs to protect crewmembers’ears when the mock gun went off.
Colon taped a bag of artificial blood to Megliola’s chest.
Pimentel ordered quiet on the set.
Elwood, as the vengeance-crazed hero, walked down the dim hall. He sees Megliola standing against the wall and brings up a heavy black gun.
Boom.
Megliola, sportswriter and thespian, meets another deadline.


( For more information about “Street Players,” visit the Web site, www.roadramblerfilms.com )
SWEET MALICE

www.b-independent.com/reviews/sweetmalice.htm    


SWEET MALICE
Produced by Lisa Robiechaud, Andrew Sawyer, and Andrew Shanley
Directed by Andrew Sawyer
Written by Andrew Sawyer, Andrew Shanley, and Thomas Pimentel
An ancient tome, withered and worn with age, thuds to the ground. The cover opens and unseen spectral flip the pages stopping on the table of
contents. It's a image we've all seen before. One that's almost iconic in horror cinema to the point of cliche, but, it's also one I find especially
endearing since it embodies everything I've come to think of as "horror." It's the documented evil that's been around long before our grandfather's
grandfathers, and will be around long after our grandchildren's grandchildren, taunting us with pain and suffering. It's the prophecies warning us of
depravity to come. It's the document of the devilish deeds men are capable of. It's also the image that opens Andy Sawyer's shortfilm collection
SWEET MALICE.

Horror is a strange cinema. You can break down the subgenres into 50 different categories, but they all can be summed up into either the
supernatural (ghosts, demons), the psychological (man vs. himself), or the physical (man vs. man/nature, ie. slashers, zombies, or various monsters).
That book dropping can represent any one of the those, and then some. It's the perfect embodiment of "horror."

With his short films Andy is equally as all-encompassing with his vision. He blends the assorted sub-genres and plays up the various conventions.
The shorts that work bring fresh spins to classic scenarios. Those that falter rarely do so not because they aren't unique, but because they're not
developed enough. They're moments found in larger movies lacking the story to function on their own.

"Botzomin" is the earliest example of Sawyer's schizophrenic storytelling. The classic images are present. The ominous phone call. The long driving
sequence...looooooong driving sequence (so long that at one point I forgot why the woman left the house in the first place and had to rewind just to
remind myself). There's the masked killer and indifferent police. After such a strong opening visual, the story fails to live up to the tone. Sawyer has
the groundwork for a decent slasher picture with an interesting looking killer in the Botzomin character, but the short lacks purpose, point, or punch.

At first "September House" seems as lazy as "Botzomin" as the camera follows a woman through her house as John Carpenter-like music plays. She
falls to her death down a set of stairs, or does she? An identical woman arises from bed at the exact same moment. Was it a dream? The opening
shot of a clock, another iconic horror image, takes meaning as it becomes clear that neither chronology or linear structure mean little. The audience
only knows what it sees.

"Sin" opens with a lengthy confessional scene between a nun and her priest. The nun is then attacked by a would-be rapist. It's the first short film that
truly contains a full story complete with a genre-blending twist that doesn't feel forced.

"Lycanthrope" follows next. If you know the meaning of the word, you'll know the subgenre this short dwells within. The story opens with two lovers in a
tent. Quickly, we jump to a Crime Scene Investigations unit surveying the aftermath of a murder's rampage at the very same tent. Through evidence
at the scene, the audience is treated to treated to flashbacks detailing the carnage. Easily the most stylistic of the shorts up to this point,
"Lycanthrope" benefits from its directors growing confidence.

"Bad Blood" recounts a woman's torment at the hands of her ex-husband and how her pent up rage gives supernatural life to household objects. The
short is a double-edged sword, on one hand the actress gives an earnest and heartfelt performance, on the other, it's her monlogue that comprised
the entire movie.

"Infested" feels like a scene from a larger movie as a young lady is chased through her house by insects. Highlights include innovative camera work
and motion fx. A more fleshed-out story would have helped with viewer involvement.

"The Tie that Binds" is a particular favorite and perhaps the best short on the compilation in terms of technical polish and storytelling. A young wiccan
documents the events leading up to a particularly hard spell that she hopes will break a decades long curse. The short is told in two intercut styles - a
conventional narrative detailing the spell and its aftermath and a close-up interview which makes the narrative all the more hardhitting and the ending
all the more poignant.

"Sarah" is the most disturbing of the bunch as it delves into psychosis and family dysfunction after a mother finds her baby girl slaughtered in her
bedroom. Classic suspense is used to drive home a twist ending that neither a cheat nor an easy way out, just brutal and shocking.

"Epiphany" is Dark Shadows melodrama if directed by Mario Bava. A lovelorn vampire and the object of his affection confront life, death, and
everything in between. When compared to "Botzomin," Sawyer shows his growth as a filmmaker with a better command of shot coverage and more
ambitious sense of storytelling. He isolates action to give each shot and spoken word a particular emphasis that's not always literal. The twist this time
around deals with who actually has the epiphany in question.

"My Sweetness" is a slasher in the "stupid girl" variety. You know the movies, the ones where the girls don't take the hints and get out of the house
when the have the chance. It's also a slasher in the "grrl power" variety where the young lady learns how to harness her inner Sigourney Weaver. A
little long in the beginning, the short benefits from a fast and furious finale.

The Vhs screener contained behind-the-scenes footage and stills galleries for the "My Sweetness," "Sin," and "The Tie that Binds."

As with any compilation, the story quality with SWEET MALICE is uneven, but when it's good, it's really good. Sawyer immerses himself is the world of
horror conventions to provide his own spin. Sometimes the shorts succeed, sometimes they don't, but they all posses merit in the sense that Sawyer
is always trying to make the shorts smarter then the cliche's allow - something more technically polished indi-horror filmmakers never even try.

New Blood Productions
Alien Influx - New Fanfilm - (23
Feb 2006)
Well here's another fanfilm. The
movie is complete but I haven't
downloaded it yet (200mb, long
time for poor me) but I have
downloaded the trailers. Doesn't
look to have the amazing SFX that
S.E.E.D does but still looks pretty
good:

"See the movie Weyland-Yutani
didn't want you to see"
So if you've got a better connection than me, head on over and download this new fanfilm.

                                                                  -- By Aaron "Corpral Hicks" Percival
"ALIEN INFLUX" gets added to the AVP website.  Thanks to the guys over at avp.gamegossip.com the
ALIEN INFLUX movie has been given another great review and is available for fans to download.  
Alien Influx (2006)
(available online)

Description: When communication is lost between Weyland-Yutaini and the level 7 labs on K1741 a team is
sent in to investgate...

Directed by: Andy Sawyer
Production Company: New Blood & Booo! Master pictures
Running time: 34 minutes
Web site: click here

Category: Alien

If you were a registered user of fanfilms.net
you'd be able to vote and comment on this film here.

Hits: 377 out
"ALIEN INFLUX" has been posted to the fanfilms.net website and is
doing quite well.  Downloads and reviews are available.  
Just Another New Fan Film  Comments
Movie News | 2/23/2006 | 8:15 PST - PseudoHero

There've been plenty of good things to report about fan films with Predators in it. Seemed like there wasn't anything out there
for just the Alien fans. Well, so much for that; in fact, it looks like the aliens have been there the whole time! Thanks to the good
people of Alien Influx, a new fan film (well, one we just found out about), the Preds aren't getting there first.




I decided to watch the movie and find out what it was about first before posting about it (no, not everybody does that), and I'm
glad that I did. It was quite a plesant experience for me to behold from the Planet AvP command center. There was even a guy
with a cowboy hat (I know it wasn't a sombrero, because Pseudo Hero knows sombreros).
"I do have to apologise for the cramped conditions in the el Capitan's shaggin wagon. It ain't really meant for 4 unless you’re
Arturian. You know what I mean?"
Man, I love that guy with the cowboy hat.

To find out what the heck Pseudo Hero is talking about, you are just going to have to watch this movie yourself. Thanks to Mike
for the news.
Special thanks to JESSE WITTON over at www.planetavp.com for posting the movie
online and giving it a great review.  Thanks for all the positive feedback.  We will take
it very seriously.
DATELINE:  AUGUST 16th, 2007
Independent filmmaker Thomas Pimentel stars
in the low-budget spoof “Indiana James and the
Raiders of the Lost Shaker of Salt,” which he
hopes to screen in October.
AUGUST 16th, 2007.  The luck of Elvis is shining over me once again.  On the 30th anniversary of the
death of the King and one day before my 30th birthday there is a glimpse of light at the end of the tunnel.  Craig
Semon from the Worcester T&G delivers another terrific article that would make any A-lister in Hollywood
blush.  ANDREW SHANLEY and myself sat down with CRAIG about two weeks ago to talk about our
upcoming projects and ideas for the future.  You can read the whole article at the following link.  Click on the
picture of a hand holding a whip.  You can't miss it.  Ironically it's right under a tribute video to ELVIS.  

http://www.telegram.com/

Thank you to Craig Semon and the folks at the Worcester T&G for another great article.  Thanks for being a fan
Craig and a great guy.  We hope to have more material for you in the future.

            Viva Manch-Vegas Baby!  
DIRECT LINK TO ARTICLE
DATELINE:  May 21st, 2008
Director , Thomas Pimentel was interviewed by
Worcester Telegram and Gazette Writer, Craig
Semon about the influence if Indiana Jones.  Click on
the link above to read the entire story about how
many others have been influenced by the success of
Indiana Jones.  Special thanks again to writer, Craig
Semon.
The following articles highlight productions that TNT LTD. PRODUCTIONS have either worked on as crew or produced on our own.  
DATELINE:  April 23rd, 2010
TNT LTD. PRODUCTIONS on Saturday April 17th, to talk
about the upcoming shoot at Brookline Moving and
Storage.   Special thanks to Matt Whorf and Patrick
Lundgren.   Click on the link below to read the story.